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  • The Fading Process

    May 29th, 2007

    • Natural Henna Body Art products contain a natural permanent dye, Lawsone. Henna Tattoos only appear to fade away because the skin itself is infact temporary; and so the body naturally regenerates its epidermis (the upper layer of skin) where the Henna Tattoo has been applied.
    • As the body sheds its dead skin cells naturally, the henna stained epidermal cells are shed and Read the full article »

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    The Final Colour

    May 29th, 2007

    • After 48 hours you will not see any further colour darkening, the Henna Stain has finished oxidising and reached its optimum colour.
    • The exact shade of each piece of Henna Body Art is dependent upon each individual's skin type , skin condition and Read the full article »

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    The Developing Process

    May 29th, 2007

    • The innitial henna staining takes place during the time that the skin is in contact with the wet henna paste. Where the colour achieved is usually a bright orange shade.
    • However, the majority of the colour appears, as if by magic, after the henna paste has dried out and Read the full article »

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    The Colouring Process

    May 29th, 2007

    • The active ingredient ‘Lawsone’ that occurs naturally in the leaves of the Henna Plant is preserved naturally within the dried henna powder.
    • The dye begins to work when the Henna Powder is activated by a catalyst, the key component being Read the full article »

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    The Geographical Origins of Henna

    May 29th, 2007

    Henna is known locally throughout the Middle East and North Africa as ‘Henna’ or ‘Hene’ and is known as ‘Mendhi’ or ‘Mehendi’ in India & Pakistan. For a list of lesser known common names click here.

    Henna powder destined for colouring the hair & adorning the skin is made from the crushed leaves of the Henna Plant Lawsonia Inermis, a tall shrub-like plant that thrives in hot and dry climates. Much of the world’s henna powder comes Read the full article »

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    A Brief History of Henna Body Art

    May 29th, 2007

    Traditionally, the art of henna application has been a predominantly female practice. This probably accounts for the lack of documented information regarding its historical use; it was not considered necessary for women to read or write in a lot of the regions where henna has long been popular until quite recently in historical terms. Instead, the local knowledge and Read the full article »

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    Lawsone ~ From Lawsonia Inermis (henna leaves)

    May 29th, 2007

    Molecular Illustration for Lawsone

    Lawsone is the phytochemical constituent of henna leaves, (and hence henna powder) that is responsible for creating the henna stain. The higher the lawsone content of the henna leaves, the deeper the resulting stain produced by the henna powder will be. On average the laswone content of ‘good quality’ henna powder is somewhere between 1% and 2%. The higher the temperatures where the Read the full article »

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    The Chemical Constituents of Henna

    May 27th, 2007

    Henna Powder is quite simply, the finely ground dried leaves of the Henna Plant (Lawsonia Inermis L). The naturally occuring chemical constituents of henna powder are often referred to as ‘Biochemicals’ or ‘Phytochemicals’, because they occur naturally within plant matter. There are many phytochemicals in the henna plant, but for the purposes of henna body art we are primarily looking at ‘henna powder’ and so we are concerned only with the phytochemicals that exist in the henna leaves.

    The Key Phytochemicals in Henna leaves are: Read the full article »

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    Traditional and Modern Day Uses For Henna

    January 5th, 2007

    Henna Powder In Bowl The henna plant has long been valued in the Eastern World for its many and varied uses (detailed below). These days the henna plant is mainly cultivated for its use as a hairdye and a cosmetic for henna body art, but it is still Read the full article »

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    The Many Names Of Henna…

    January 4th, 2007

    Scientific Name Preferred Scientific Name: Lawsonia Inermis L

    Other Scientific Names
    Lawsonia alba Lam. (no longer recognised as the scientific name)

    Trade Name
    Henna Read the full article »

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